Monthly Archives: September 2017

*Chasing the Traveller Cover Reveal*

‘I’ve fled from my husband and the only life I’ve ever known. I’m terrified that if he finds me, I’ll never find myself.’

Kat is trapped in a world where she has never belonged. As a traveller, she has always felt lost, especially since the death of her parents in a fire when she was fourteen years old. Having been taken on by the Denton family as their own, Kat falls in love with their son, tearaway Jimmy. His charm soon wears off and Kat finds herself married to a controlling and violent thug.

Sixteen years later, Kat decides enough is enough and begins plotting her escape from a lifetime of abuse.

Stripped of her personality, Kat has no idea how to start again but she finds an unlikely ally in her sister-in-law Ellie who shows Kat that she is not alone.

Kat and Ellie Denton begin their venture into a new world, where they meet new people and build new lives. But Kat still wants to know more about her parents’ past and when she seeks the location of an address on the back of a family photograph, Kat begins to uncover more than she expected including a revelation that will lead Kat back to the traveller site she had been so desperate to escape from.

Will she find the answers she is looking for, or will she fall prey to the violent Jimmy Denton once more?

*

Chasing the Traveller is due to be released on 25th November, 2017 and is available for pre-order now. 

Alex Kane has been kind enough to share the fantastic cover with us, and a small sample to whet our appetites.

I’ve had the privilege of reading this story and it’s an engaging portrayal of a woman’s desperation to free herself from domestic abuse and find her own way in the world. A full review will be posted here on 26th November. 

Now, here’s the bit you’ve been waiting for – the sneak peak: 

*

He grabbed my face, digging his filthy nails into my cheeks. I wrapped my hands around his wrist, willing myself to push him away.

“Let me go!” I screamed but he only tightened his grip. I glanced back up at the sky but no longer could I see that single star; the clouds were no longer lined with a white shimmer. I was alone, as always, fighting the demons I could never defeat.

I heard the familiar sounds of the Allen key opening the entrance to hell. The belly box, which matched the width and breadth of the wagon, was cold at this time of year. I was thrown to the ground because he needed two hands to open the entry. It was my chance to escape but I had nowhere to run to. Fear rooted me to the ground which I wanted to open up and swallow me. Hell itself would be better than what was ahead of me. Another set of hands held on to my shoulders and my heart sunk. Two against one just was not fair.

*

Alex Kane is from Glasgow and writes psychological thrillers. Her newest novel, set to be released late 2017 is set in several towns and villages in and around Glasgow, an area which she is familiar with. Alex loves to read whenever she can, favouring psychological thrillers and crime. She loves something that will get under her skin and make her think about the story long after she has finished it.

Her inspirations are BA Paris, Lisa Hall and Paula Hawkins. Alex is currently working on her new novel. You can follow Alex on Twitter and Facebook.

Don’t forget to check back on 26th November for my review of ‘Chasing the Traveller‘. 

Vic x

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*Shadows Cover Reveal*

Shadows will be published on the 14th of October by ThunderPoint Publishing Ltd.

When DI Donna Davenport is called out to investigate a body washed up on Arbroath beach, it looks like a routine murder inquiry. However, it doesn’t take long before it begins to take on a more sinister shape.  There are similarities with a previous murder, and now a woman who is connected with them goes missing.

For Donna, these events become personal, and add to the feeling that she’s being watched, she is convinced that Jonas Evanton  has returned to seek his revenge on her for his downfall.  Fearing they may be looking for a serial killer, the trail leads Donna and her new team in an unexpected direction.  Because it’s not a serial killer – it’s worse.

Moving from Dundee to the south coast of Turkey and the Syrian border, this is a fast-paced novel about those who live their lives in the shadows and those who would exploit them.

“Not for the first time, Donna found herself wondering how the hell she had ended up  in a situation like this.”

Jackie McLean lives in Glasgow with her partner Allison. Jackie has a varied background, including being a government economist, a political lobbyist, and running a pet shop. She is in and out of prison a lot (in her current job with social work services).

Toxic is her first crime novel, introducing DI Donna Davenport, and was shortlisted in the Yeovil Literary Prize before publication by ThunderPoint Publishing Ltd. The sequel, Shadows, is about to be published, and she has begun work on the third book in the DI Davenport series (Run). Jackie runs Get Writing Glasgow, which is a kind of Weight Watchers for writers, hosted by Waterstones at Braehead.

You can find Jackie on Facebook and Twitter.

In the Scottish university city of Dundee, life and all its complications are the same as usual. The recklessly brilliant DI Donna Davenport, struggling to hide a secret from police colleagues as she tries to get over the break-up with her partner, is in trouble with her boss for a fiery and inappropriate outburst to the press.

DI Evanton, an old-fashioned, hard-living misogynistic copper has been newly demoted for thumping a suspect, and transferred to Dundee with a final warning ringing in his ears, carrying a reputation that precedes him.

And in the peaceful, rolling Tayside farmland a deadly store of MIC, the toxin that devastated Bhopal, is being illegally stored by a criminal gang smuggling the valuable substance necessary for making cheap pesticides. An anonymous tip-off starts a desperate search for the MIC that is complicated by the uneasy partnership between Davenport and Evanton and their growing mistrust of each other’s actions.

Compelling and authentic, Toxic is a tense and fast paced crime thriller.

Don’t Quit the Day Job: Neil White on A Life of Crime

Today we’re kicking off a new series on the blog entitled ‘Don’t Quit the Day Job’. 

Lots of people don’t realise that although you may see work by a certain author on the bookshelves in your favourite shop, many writers still hold down a day job in addition to penning their next novel. In this series, we’ll talk to writers about how their current – or previous – day jobs have inspired and informed their writing.

Today I have the pleasure of hosting Neil White on the blog. Neil read at Noir at the Bar in Harrogate this year and it was a delight working with him. He’s taken the time to speak to me about a life of crime – thanks for sharing your story with us, Neil!

Vic x

Readers of crime fiction follow the genre for the excitement, the intrigue, the thrills. How does that match with life in the world of real crime?

I’ve been a criminal solicitor for more than twenty years, working as both a defence lawyer and a prosecutor, and I’d love to tell you of things I’ve done that will show how spine-tingling it can be. The race to get to witnesses in time, bringing them to court under the protection of blankets, always acting under the threat of violent repercussions, exposed to gangland threats and psychopathic murderers.

Of course, it would be exciting if that reflected real life, but it doesn’t.

That isn’t to say that working in criminal law doesn’t come with its occasional moments of intrigue and excitement, but the reality is that most of any lawyer’s immersion into crime is long stretches of tedium interspersed with moments of amusement.

As I write this, I am sitting in a Magistrates Court, water dripping through the ceiling, part of the public gallery sealed off by builder’s tape, awaiting a verdict on a trial involving a spat at a party. There is some anticipation, but not at any level that could be called exciting. It will never be an inspiration for a bestselling novel, but it’s what constitutes the day-to-day life of most criminal lawyers.

In writing crime fiction, as a criminal lawyer, I want to be realistic, but does realistic mean “as real life”? For the most part, being a lawyer helps when writing crime, but there is also the temptation to include too much of the mundane. What I have to tell myself is that the character has many such dull days, with routine and tedium, but the story I am telling is the one exciting case they get a year. Every lawyer gets them. The dinner party story, or one of those war stories bandied around when passing time in the courtroom, lawyers reminiscing as an excuse for not talking to their client pacing outside.

As a prosecutor, the excitement would come from a murder, when a suspect was in custody and the police needed a decision to be made before there was a risk of the custody clock running out. Whichever lawyer gets the job can often be down to a mixture of enthusiasm and availability. Becoming involved in a murder case during the arrest phase isn’t something that clocks off at five o’clock, and sometimes I just had something else planned.

For my part, I tended to get landed with the complex fraud cases, usually out of curiosity. I’d be wandering through the office and see a couple of boxes of files being booked in by one of the people whose job it is to book these things in and I’d stop by, enquire as to the contents, out of nothing more than an inquisitive mind. I knew that every prosecutor in the room had taken a sudden interest in their fingernails, knowing what was coming, but I couldn’t stop myself.

I’d respond with a “that sounds interesting”, because I’m curious like that, and because I’m polite, and then listen to the collective sigh of relief as it was announced that the case had become mine. A reward for my interest. I never learned.

Does it make it easier to write crime fiction being a lawyer? Perhaps. A little bit.

I think it helps with the ability to look at things coldly and objectively, to take a step outside of the emotional attachment. It helps too to be comfortable with the subject matter. I’m used to looking at forensic statements and dealing with police procedures and the rules of evidence. If I need to research something, I can perhaps get to the end point much quicker.

Apart from those things, however, I’m not sure it makes a whole lot of difference, and in some ways can be a hindrance, because the desire to be accurate can override the need to be interesting. Sometimes, I find myself looking at a story as a lawyer, not a writer, and you read my books to hear a writer write, not a lawyer speak.

One thing writing about crime does do, however, is that it reminds me why I chose it as a career. At its best, the courtroom is high drama. It’s conflict and dispute, about dark deeds hidden or uncovered, often a glimpse into how others people live their lives. It is that reality, the human side of crime, which drives my love of the subject. I love crime. I love it that much I’m pretty sure that if I hadn’t qualified as a lawyer, I’d have chosen criminality as a career.

Some may say that the dividing line between a lawyer and a crook is a pretty thin one anyway. I could not possibly comment.

Review: ‘Fox Hunter’ by Zoë Sharp

When I was asked to review Zoë Sharp‘s twelfth book in the Charlie Fox series, Fox Hunter, I jumped at the chance. Having heard her read excerpts from this novel at the most recent Noir at the Bars in Newcastle and Harrogate, I couldn’t wait to read the whole thing!

Fox Hunter drops the reader right into the middle of the action in Iraq with the discovery of a body. The body of a man who just so happened to be one of the men that brutally put an end to Ms Fox’s military career. Charlie had promised many years ago that she wouldn’t go looking for them but in Fox Hunter she isn’t given a choice.

Sean Meyer, her boss and former lover, has gone missing and Charlie is worried that Sean may be out for revenge against the men who harmed her. She’s tasked with stopping Sean before he tracks down the other men but must keep her wits about her as she becomes the hunted.

Fox Hunter is a total thrill ride from start to finish. It’s fast-moving and never gives you a second to catch your breath.

Zoë Sharp has deftly weaved a pacey narrative with a compelling cast of characters. I really admire the female characters in this novel, of which there are several: they’re strong both physically and emotionally as well as showing believable vulnerabilities. I loved the juxtaposition between these women and the Muslim countries they visit in their line of work. I thought Sharp also weaved interesting similarities portraying the ways in which women are subjugated in all cultures.

The ongoing love story between Charlie and Sean also twists and turns, keeping the reader guessing whether Meyer is friend or foe.

I’ve heard many people rave about the Charlie Fox books – Lee Child has famously said that if Jack Reacher were a woman, he’d be Charlie Fox. High praise indeed, and now I see why. If you like your books to be a non-stop thrill featuring flawed characters, the Charlie Fox series is the one for you.

Vic x

Getting to Know You: Caroline Roberts

Next month, I will be interviewing Stephanie Butland and Caroline Roberts at Berwick Literary Festival. Today, I’m warming up by getting to know Caroline.

Thanks to Caroline for taking the time to speak with us today. 

Vic x

Tell us about your novels.
I have 4 published novels all set in Northumberland:

The Torn Up Marriage is about love, loss, betrayal and family – a story about ‘messy’ love, and how hard relationships can be when we tear our own worlds apart.

The Cosy Teashop in the Castle and The Cosy Christmas Teashop, its sequel, are romantic comedy novels set in a quirky Northumberland Castle inspired by the wonderful Chillingham Castle near to where I live. My friend ran the tea rooms there for seven years. It’s a story about striving for your dreams, finding your identity, with a host of delightful characters and of course  lots of tea, cake and romance.

My Summer of Magic Moments is a love story about rediscovering those special moments in life, especially after a gruelling time. Claire has recently finished breast cancer treatment and escapes to a cottage on the Northumberland coast. I particularly love the setting at Bamburgh which is one of my all-time favourite places. It’s a story about love, healing, and finding your way through life.

I think through all my books I’m trying to explore love in words, not just romantic, sexual love, but the love between family and friendships too.

What inspired them?
My interest in relationships sparks it all off – things I see in real life, read about in magazines or newspapers. And the settings are very much inspired by my wonderful home county of Northumberland where I have lived for fifteen years, its rolling hills, castles and stunning coastline.

Where do you get your ideas from?
My ideas come from things I have seen, read, overheard, experienced, then I let my imagination take over. A real place can start me thinking about what might happen there. I knew I wanted to set a book at the cottages I used to jog past, nestled right beside the beach between Bamburgh and Seahouses – that became My Summer of Magic Moments.

Do you have a favourite story / character / scene you’ve written?
My favourite novel is my latest, My Summer of Magic Moments. It is particularly special to me as it was informed by a wonderful lady who herself had gone through breast cancer. It also has lots of real moments included from my family and friends. This book carries a little piece of my heart, and I feel so thankful to have had it published.

What’s the best writing advice you’ve ever been given and who it was
from?
“Don’t get it right, get it written”, a friend from the Romantic Novelists’ Association told me that (I think originally it may have been from Dorothea Brande’s book). It’s so true and stops you procrastinating about getting it perfect first time, which I think can cripple many a writer. Just let the creative juices flow and get the story out. Later is the time for editing.

What can readers expect from your books?
A really good love story, with fun, family, friends and food, set against something sad such as loss, grief and betrayal – the hard stuff that affects us all at times in life, all in a beautiful Northumberland setting.

Have you got any advice for aspiring writers?

  • Write what you are passionate about. If you love what you write this will make the writing process so much easier, and it will come through to readers (and hopefully publishers/agents if you are looking to be published) and spark their imagination and interest too.
  • Finish the book! Don’t pressure yourself that it has to be perfect. Just keep going forward and get the story out. Make time to write regularly, and you will get there. Editing is for later.
  • Submitting – If publication is your aim, finish the book, polish up your first 3 chapters, spend time on your synopsis and cover letter, and only then start sending it out. Try and be as professional as possible. Do your research on who you are submitting to – and send exactly what they ask for. Do try and personalise your cover letter to show you have spent time finding out about them/their company.
  • Persevere – the submission process can be long and hard, and rejection is never easy. Try not to take it too personally – easier said than done, I know – but keep going and try and learn from any critical feedback you might get.
  • Link up with other writers. Look for local groups, or link with groups in your genre. The support and friendship within organisations such as the Romantic Novelists’ Association is invaluable. It was only by taking a deep breath and pitching at the RNA Conference that I got my book deal offers.

What do you like and dislike about writing?
I love the creative process – getting lost in my imaginary worlds where the scenes unroll and the characters seem so real. I also really like meeting and chatting with readers.
Dislikes: Deadlines, writing a novel to a short deadline set by the publisher can feel somewhat stifling. Marketing and publicity can also be challenging and time-consuming too, I really didn’t have a clue how much the author is expected to do of this themselves before I got published, though I’m much more comfortable with this side of things now.

Are you writing anything at the moment?
I’m on the final edit stage of my next book, The Cosy Christmas Chocolate Shop,  a romantic comedy set in a fictional Northumberland harbour village that’s a mash-up of Craster with Warkworth plus a few tweaks of my own. I had great fun researching all things chocolate for this book, and was inspired and helped by two fabulous local chocolatiers.

What’s your favourite writing-related moment?
Holding the first paperback copy of my debut novel, The Torn Up Marriage, in my hands. That was such a special feeling. I had spent over ten years trying to get my novels published and it was a real ‘I Did It!’ moment. A dream come true.

Death at the Docks

A wonderful write-up of Death at the Docks – thanks to Jennifer C Wilson.

Source: Death at the Docks

Review: ‘Ragdoll’ by Daniel Cole.

Following his reinstatement to the Met, Detective ‘Wolf’ Fawkes is woken early one morning to investigate a terrifying multiple murder: all of the victims stitched together in a hideous ragdoll. Nicknamed by the press as ‘The Ragdoll Killer’, Wolf’s adversary taunts him by releasing a hit list to the baying media, including the dates on which he will murder them.

Brilliantly dark with moments of humour, Ragdoll kept me reading late into the night. I honestly did not want to put this novel down. It’s a high-concept thriller, intelligently written with incredible pace – I can see why it was nominated for the CWA John Creasy award for Best Debut. With twists and turns galore, Ragdoll will have you reading from the edge of your seat.

Vic x