Daily Archives: September 7, 2017

Getting to Know You: Ian Skewis

Today on the blog is Ian Skewis. Having met Ian at Noir at the Bar Edinburgh earlier this year, I can tell you that his writing may be dark but he is an absolute joy to be around. I’m hoping to lure Ian to Newcastle to appear at our Noir at the Bar at some point! 

In the meantime, we’ll have to content ourselves with getting to know him on the blog! Thanks for taking the time to be involved, Ian.

Vic x

Photo by Pablo Llopis

Tell us about your book.
A Murder Of Crows is a dark tale about a detective who is on his final case. He is in search of a young couple who go missing in the woods during a violent thunderstorm. As the clues unfold he discovers a serial killer who is just getting started…

What inspired it?
I found the dead body of a man hanging from a tree when I was nine years old. The story is not based on that event, but the haunting atmosphere from that day is very much prevalent throughout this book.

Where do you get your ideas from?
Most of my ideas stem from everyday situations, which I then turn on their head and transform into something darker. I talk a lot when in company but often I will simply watch and listen – to what people don’t say, which is usually far more interesting! Jack Russell, the detective in this story, turns this particular trait into an art form.

Do you have a favourite story / character / scene you’ve written?
I really enjoyed writing Alice Smith’s chapters. She was the most challenging character to create because she suffers from dementia and I had to write it from her perspective. She’s one of the most popular characters in the book and was my personal favourite to write for.

What’s the best writing advice you’ve ever been given and who it was from?
It was probably when Michael J Malone told me to accept my publishing deal. I had spent so many years procrastinating that even when a publishing deal was laid out on the table, as it were, I still couldn’t bring myself to do it. I’m now very glad I did!

What can readers expect from your books?
My work is dark, haunting, almost verging on supernatural at times. There is a wry sense of humour there too. And a great deal of drama!

Have you got any advice for aspiring writers?
It seems obvious, but the most important thing is to just write. Don’t procrastinate like I did. Write even if it turns out to be nonsense, because you will be learning the craft whether it’s good or bad. Secondly, have courage. It’s a huge undertaking to write a novel, particularly for the first time. Lastly, an inner critic is healthy, but don’t let that voice inside you get too loud. Make sure you get good advice from professionals too. Your friends and family will love whatever you write, so always pursue a proper honest opinion from elsewhere.

What do you like and dislike about writing?
I love creating entire worlds. That’s a very liberating palette to work from. I dislike editing, but it is very important, and has to be done. I also dislike the lack of time I have.

Are you writing anything at the moment?
Always! At the moment I’m writing the sequel to A Murder Of Crows. I am also working on two other novels and have just finished a short story for a forthcoming anthology called Borrowed.

What’s your favourite writing-related moment?
Probably seeing my book in print, especially that moment of unboxing it and seeing it in all its glory. Having it hit the high street book shops was such a thrill too. And I enjoy public appearances. I’m appearing at Bloody Scotland next, which is the biggest event I’ve been invited to speak at so far. I’m very excited about that!