Category Archives: Review

Review: ‘Ragdoll’ by Daniel Cole.

Following his reinstatement to the Met, Detective ‘Wolf’ Fawkes is woken early one morning to investigate a terrifying multiple murder: all of the victims stitched together in a hideous ragdoll. Nicknamed by the press as ‘The Ragdoll Killer’, Wolf’s adversary taunts him by releasing a hit list to the baying media, including the dates on which he will murder them.

Brilliantly dark with moments of humour, Ragdoll kept me reading late into the night. I honestly did not want to put this novel down. It’s a high-concept thriller, intelligently written with incredible pace – I can see why it was nominated for the CWA John Creasy award for Best Debut. With twists and turns galore, Ragdoll will have you reading from the edge of your seat.

Vic x

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Review: ‘Dead Writers in Rehab’ by Paul Bassett Davies

I’ve been tweeting about this book while I read it and people are tremendously entertained by the title. Well, I’ve got to say that the story lives up to its giggle-inducing moniker.

Foster James – a literary reprobate – wakes up in a strange country house, he presumes he’s been on yet another bender which has resulted in admission to rehab, a cycle he’s become awfully familiar with. However, when Ernest Hemingway punches him in the face, Foster soon realises that this is not your typical institution.

Holed up with a host of famous writers, Foster has to work out what’s actually led him to this unusual place but, of course, his investigation don’t run smoothly thanks to the other writers, especially Dorothy Parker who certainly catches Foster’s attention.

Dead Writers in Rehab is like a light-hearted One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest if the patients were authors. It’s a brilliant concept with plenty of laugh out loud moments. It’s totally unique while managing to be intelligent and funny at the same time – there aren’t many books on the shelf that can boast that.

Easy to read and full of laughs, I highly recommend this novel.

Vic x

Review: ‘This Family of Things’ by Alison Jameson

Bird Keegan, a lonely farmer, and his two sisters have lived an isolated existence in the same community their whole lives but when Midge O’Connor – a young woman abused by her drunken father – appears, his world is disrupted beyond his wildest imagination. By taking in Midge, Bird is mocked by his sisters and neighbours. Despite bringing one another consolation, the pair’s relationship is thrown into doubt by the influence of others.

Alison Jameson’s prose captures the reader’s attention with this story of love and redemption. The lives of the three siblings are explored with sensitivity. The isolation and misery are represented skillfully. Jameson’s writing features some very powerful imagery as well as excellent descriptions. I could really imagine the setting thanks to the author’s florid language. The multi-layered characters are examined in a thoughtful manner.

Fans of Kate Kerrigan will like ‘This Family of Things.

Vic x

Review: ‘Cragside’ by LJ Ross.

DCI Ryan may have been expecting a sedate summer with his fiancée in the run-up to their wedding, living within the grounds of Cragside, a spectacular Northumberland mansion surrounded by forests but where would the fun be in that?

Despite his misgivings, Ryan attends the staff summer party – a Victorian murder mystery evening – but when the lights go out and an elderly staff member is found dead, Ryan and his team must undertake a new case on his own doorstep.

Taking her DCI Ryan series in a slightly different direction, LJ Ross has written ‘Cragside‘ in a similar style to crime novels of the golden age but manages not to alienate readers of her past works: no mean feat. The ensemble cast of characters reminded me of a modern-day Poirot and I think a Bavarian-style mansion is one of the few contemporary settings where readers will believe you still have a butler, chauffeur, maid and a variety of other staff. Ross also uses facts about Cragside (as with all of her previous novels, this is a real place in the North-East) to strengthen her story.

LJ Ross skillfully builds up mystery alongside police procedural as well as romance, appealing to many readers. ‘Cragside‘ can be read as part of the ongoing DCI Ryan series or as a stand-alone – you will be able to read this without reading the previous ones although I highly recommend that you read the whole series.

Vic x

Review: ‘I Know My Name’ by C.J. Cooke

A woman is washed ashore on a remote Greek island without knowing who she is or how she got there. Meanwhile in London, a mother of two is missing but her passport, mobile phone and cards are still in the house. During the investigation, police uncover lie after lie but seem no closer to working out what happened to Eloise.

I Know My Name‘ is a compelling read with a shocking ending. With interesting characters and an intriguing mystery at its heart, ‘I Know My Name‘ gripped me from the outset. C.J. Cooke has managed to create realistic, flawed characters without the reader ever losing sympathy or interest.

I love a twist and C.J. Cooke did not disappoint. A must-read.

Vic x

Review: ‘Reported Missing’ by Sarah Wray.

Reported Missing is a fantastic debut that keeps you guessing until the very end.

Sarah Wray expertly builds up tension from the very first page of this thrilling novel.

The reader can’t help but empathise with Rebecca, the wife of a man who went missing on the same day as teenager Kayleigh. Having said that, Rebecca is such a realistic character that I found myself really frustrated with her at times – the same way her friend Jeannie would be. To build nuance like this is a real skill. I really loved that Wray depicted her characters as flawed humans – rather than saints or sinners.

I would absolutely recommend this novel. I can’t wait to see what Sarah Wray writes next!

Vic x

Review: ‘The Last Cut’ by Danielle Ramsay

If Martina Cole says it’s good, it’s good – right? Well, the Queen of Crime is quoted on Amazon as saying that The Last Cut is ‘a really cracking read’.

Featuring DS Harri Jacobs and set in Newcastle, The Last Cut is the first in a new series by Danielle Ramsay, writer of the DI Jack Brady books.

Harri Jacobs has returned to her hometown of Newcastle following a brutal attack she endured at the hands of an unknown assailant while working for the Met. With her rapist still at large and the first anniversary of the assault looming, Harri is understandably on edge. However, the tension is cranked up when Harri begins to suspect she is being followed. Add to that a murder victim with similarities to Harri and the reader, along with Harri, are plunged into a nightmare of paranoia and fear in a tense game of cat and mouse.

I really liked the fact that much of the action was set in Newcastle. It was interesting to see how places familiar to me could be turned into dark, threatening locations. Danielle really has a knack for using location to add another layer to her stories.

The Last Cut is a claustrophobic read that had me rather terrified. The twisted characters that Harri comes into contact with chilled me to the bone. Hats off to Danielle Ramsay for creating this pervading sense of discomfort and the uncertainty over who to trust.

Turns out that the last cut is the deepest…

Vic x