Tag Archives: drafting

Don’t Quit the Day Job: Rachel Amphlett

Welcome to the first Don’t Quit the Day Job of 2018! It seems like a long time since Paul Gitsham’s post, doesn’t it? 

Lots of people don’t realise that although you may see work by a certain author on the bookshelves in your favourite shop, many writers still hold down a day job in addition to penning their next novel. In this series, we talk to writers about how their current – or previous – day jobs have inspired and informed their writing.

Kicking us off for 2018 we have Rachel Amphlett, the bestselling author of the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the new Detective Kay Hunter series, as well as a number of standalone crime thrillers. Rachel’s novels have been compared to Robert Ludlum, Lee Child and Michael Crichton.

You can follow Rachel on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram as well as her website.

Vic x

Prior to becoming a full-time writer, I spent many a year working as a project and contracts administrator supporting engineers in delivering major projects in the gas, infrastructure, and railway industries.

It doesn’t sound as sexy as crime thriller author by a long way, but those years behind the scenes have served me well in my current career as a writer.

For example, I was surrounded by people who had held different roles prior to turning to project management, and often within the armed forces. As an author of espionage fiction for a number of years, it meant that if I kept my ears open while ferreting around making sure sub-contractors were paid on time and monthly reports were delivered to management without a hitch, I could bribe someone with a coffee in return for hearing about their military experiences.

From an ex-Lynx helicopter pilot to a weapons guidance systems engineer who helped me blow up a submarine in Under Fire, I had all sorts of combat and non-combat experience at my fingertips – and I made full use of it.

On top of that, chatting with colleagues in the break-out area, I soon had an offer of being taken pistol shooting so I could find out what it was really like to fire a weapon.

When my writing took off in 2016, I’d already been implementing a lot of project management techniques within my writing business and these enabled me to really focus on what was important.

The best tool in my business is that of a project schedule – I use a simple Excel spreadsheet format for this, which gives me a 12-month look-ahead for the books I want to write and publish (typically a minimum of three), broken down into the steps that need to be taken to publish each book.  These include finishing the first draft, getting the final draft to beta readers, drafting again before handing over to an editor, working with my cover designer, and setting up everything else that is needed to publish a book successfully (and on time).

I can then highlight the really important milestones that I need to hit for those books – this is known as being on the “critical path” in project-speak. That is, if I don’t hit those milestones, there is no book!

Having this project schedule keeps me focused – and, if something changes during the year that means I have to switch a project with another to take advantage of an opportunity, I can. All I have to do is adjust the dates, and off I go again.

Now that I’m a full-time writer, I can use this scheduling tool to make the most of my time – it’s likely going into 2018 that I’ll double my output, but at least using my project background, I’ll be able to keep track of where I am and mitigate any hiccups along the way.

Could I be this productive without a project management background?

I doubt it very much.

Advertisements

Review of 2017: Lucy Cameron

I am so happy to have my “sister” Lucy Cameron on the blog today. Lucy and I first met at Crime and Publishment almost two years ago and since then, we have discovered we have an unhealthy amount of things in common! I have so many happy memories of times with Lucy and I feel so lucky to know her. 

I hope you enjoy Lucy’s 2017 review as much as I did!

Vic x

Do you have a favourite memory professionally from 2017?
I most certainly do. My debut novel Night Is Watching was published on the 6th April this year. I had an amazing launch at the Theatre Royal in Dumfries with loads of family and friends. The wonderful Matt Hilton was The Host with the Most and as one of the first writers I met when I moved to Dumfries that was pretty special. After several years of waiting for Night Is Watching to be published the launch exceeded all of my dreams and was one of the best experiences of my year, quite possibly my life, so far.

And how about a favourite moment from 2017 generally?
There are so many it is really hard to pick. I will go with buying my house. The day I got the keys and had a glass of fizz with family and friends was brilliant. Seven months later there is still plenty of work to do but it is finally starting to feel like home.

Favourite book in 2017?
Still Bleeding 
by Steve Mosby. Wow. Wow. Wow. I am a huge fan of Steve Mosby but Still Bleeding really blew me away. This book is a clever page turner that has stayed with me long after I finished it. As soon as I finish drafting my current work in progress I will read it again – and there are very few books I have read twice.

Favourite film in 2017?
I haven’t watched many films this year so What We Do In The Shadows remains my current favourite. It’s an Australian mockumentary about a group of vampire flatmates. It is laugh out loud funny so great for lifting my spirits – it has dark elements to it (it is about vampires, after all) but well worth a giggle.

Favourite song of the year?
I don’t really have one as I rarely listen to music. Anything by Take That – judge that as you may.

Any downsides for you in 2017?
A year is made of ups and down but nothing major on the down front for me this year. The year has been a good one but feels like it has gone very quickly so I guess the standard ‘not enough hours in the day’ would be a downside if anything.

Are you making resolutions for 2018?
I love the start of a new year and am always full of great plans and ideas. I would like to get fit in 2018 and as the chaos of my house move settles plan some proper writing time Monday to Friday.

What are you hoping for from 2018?
I hope to continue to be happy, spend quality time with family and friends, be healthy.
Book-wise I plan to finish the follow-up book to Night Is Watching and in addition try a bit of comedy writing as it is something completely different.

Don’t Quit the Day Job: Dave Sivers

Lots of people don’t realise that although you may see work by a certain author on the bookshelves in your favourite shop, many writers still hold down a day job in addition to penning their next novel. In this series, we’ll talk to writers about how their current – or previous – day jobs have inspired and informed their writing.

Today as part of ‘Don’t Quit the Day Job’, we have Dave Sivers here to talk to us about how being a civil servant helped inspire him to write the Archer and Baines novels. Yes, really! 

My thanks to Dave for taking the time to share his experiences with us. You can find Dave on Twitter and Facebook

Vic x

I’ve pretty much always been a writer, ever since I was six years old. But for 40 years, before I took the plunge into indie authorship, and before the Archer and Baines novels, I was a career civil servant.

Every morning, I’d put on a suit and either catch the train to London or drive off to a meeting somewhere. You’re probably already imagining a grey office, full of grey people, some of them covered in cobwebs, drinking copious cups of tea and churning out dry-as-dust papers on even drier subjects.

It’s a caricature with a grain of accuracy in it, but I mostly enjoyed that career and was usually happy enough to get out of bed in the morning. I worked on a wide range of policy issues, and no two days were the same. I got some great travel opportunities and got to do some interesting things. I also met all kinds of characters, including quite a few military people, and some serious game players who knew exactly how to get their way.

Every writer’s everyday life is grist to the creative mill. What I didn’t know at the time, though, was how much the day job was preparing me a new career, after early retirement, when I’d be writing police procedurals.

Writing those papers was in itself an invaluable writing discipline: adopting the right voice for the right circumstances, drafting and redrafting, writing to a length and deadline. But it’s only recently that I’ve come to realise just how much more I owe to those Whitehall days.

As a storyteller, I’m far more pantster than plotter. When I start a book, I invariably have a body. I (usually) know who did it. But I will have either a hazy idea, or no idea at all, of how the killer will get caught. That comes out in the writing. Effectively, I sit on my cops’ shoulders and watch their investigation unfold. And it’s my civil service instincts that are telling me what they need to do.

For a start, I worked in teams as do the police, in a hierarchy that more or less mirrored the police ranking system. And we might not have unmasking murderers, but there was a lot of problem solving involved – which meant gathering information, and knowing what questions to ask, and whom to ask them of.

Of course, I still need to make calls and do internet searches to check whether what they get up to is plausible, or even legal, as well as checking out some of the smaller details I sprinkle around. But it turns out that all those years in a suit were invaluable training for imagining myself into the briefing room at Aylesbury nick and deciding what Archer and Baines need to do next to catch their killer.

My old day job included drafting answers to Parliamentary Questions, and some unkind souls have suggested – unfairly, obviously – that I was always a fiction writer! I’m saying nothing.

The latest book in the Archer & Baines series – ‘The Blood that Binds’ – is available now.