Tag Archives: reader

**One More Lie Blog Tour**

Charlotte wants a new start. This means forgetting her past – including the years she’s spent in prison and her friend Sean. But, even with a new identity, moving on proves to be less than simple. 

Wearing an ankle monitor, Charlotte visits her therapist regularly but her demons begin to close in, dragging her back down a path which takes her closer to the crime that ruined her life. 

From the moment I picked up ‘One More Lie‘, I was utterly compelled by this original premise. Combining an intriguing idea with skilful plotting and rounded characters, Amy Lloyd has written another gem. 

Amy Lloyd writes with real skill – presenting her characters with empathy and depth. I loved the fact that, despite knowing Charlotte had been involved in something hideous, I couldn’t help but care for her. The supporting characters are used excellently to illustrate the difficulties Charlotte experiences – as well as the kindness she is shown. 

The way in which the story is presented ensures that the reader is kept gripped throughout. ‘One More Lie‘ is one of those books that I kept promising myself “one more chapter” at bedtime then finding myself still reading ages later! 

You can download ‘One More Lie‘ now – or pre-order a physical copy. You won’t regret it – ‘One More Lie‘ had me completely hooked.

Vic x

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Review: ‘The Secretary’ by Renee Knight

Look around you. Who holds the most power in the room? Is it the one who speaks loudest, who looks the part, who has the most money, who commands the most respect?

Or is it someone like Christine Butcher: a meek, overlooked figure, who silently bears witness as secrets are shared  Someone who quietly, perhaps even unwittingly, gathers together the knowledge of the people she’s there to serve – the ones who don’t notice her, the ones who consider themselves to be important.

There’s a fine line between loyalty and obsession. And when someone like Christine Butcher is pushed to her limit, she might become the most dangerous person in the room . . .

Christine is an average wife and mother, who is the personal assistant to Mina Appleton, the chair of a large supermarket chain. Following accusations of unethical practices within Mina’s business, Christine has to decide how far she wants to go to prove her loyalty to her boss in a surprisingly cutthroat industry. 

As ‘The Secretary‘ progresses, told through Christine’s eyes, it was interesting as a reader to work out what had happened to Christine and where she was telling her story from. When this was revealed where she actually was, I was quite surprised. Renee Knight didn’t go for the most obvious explanation and I appreciated that. 

I thought Renee Knight’s characterisation in this novel was very strong. I enjoyed the transformation in Christine as her job became all-encompassing. I thought the character of Mina seemed really believable, her manipulative behaviour certainly seemed to represent what we have come to expect from heads of corporations. In many ways, ‘The Secretary‘ reminded me of ‘The Devil Wears Prada‘. 

I thought the idea of having the central crime in this novel centre around unethical business practices and perverting the course of justice was really original. Although it may not initially seem as compelling as murder, this story seemed really realistic and the behaviour of the characters made me want to read on. This is a character-driven psychological thriller which keeps the tension tight throughout.

Vic x

**Running in Circles Blog Tour**

 

Today we welcome to the blog Claire Gray to the blog as part of the blog tour to celebrate the release of her new novel ‘Running in Circles‘.


Claire Gray lives in
 the South Lakes with her husband and two small children. She studied Creative Writing at the Cumbria Institute of the Arts. She graduated in 2006 and then went on to complete a journalism course at Darlington College. 


That same year
, Claire won a Northern Promise Award from New Writing North, and her work was featured in their anthology, ‘Ten Years On‘. Claire now works as a freelance copywriter and continues to write short stories, some of which have been published in magazines and online. 


Sapere Books published ‘Running in Circles‘ in 2019 and Claire is really excited to have published her first novel!
My thanks to Claire for sharing her experiences with us.


Vic x

Don’t Quit the Day Job: 
Claire Gray

It’s difficult for novelists to make a living purely through their writing. I’m probably only a Google search away from the official statistics, but I would guess only a tiny percentage of authors are able to sit at their desks every day, working on their latest manuscript, without worrying about paying the heating bill or feeding the kids. 


Many
 novelists supplement their income by working in education, or by editing other people’s work or writing for newspapers and magazines. That’s the tier of professional writing that I aspiring to reach, and it still seems very far away. But I don’t think it’s necessarily bad to be in the position that I, and many other writers, are in. We’re the writers who have day jobs; jobs completely unrelated to the creative work we do. While it can be challenging in terms of time management, and occasionally dispiriting because of how far removed it is from what we really want to be doing, having a day job is valuable. To write you need to have life experience. Working is one of the most natural ways to achieve this. 


I studied Creative Writing at college and then found myself
 working in betting shops across Cumbria and the north-east. What started as a weekend job rapidly became full-time as I realised (and probably should have realised much earlier) that Creative Writing is not a vocational course. But it wasn’t all bad. I met some interesting characters amongst the staff and the customers. There was a period in Newcastle-upon-Tyne where I narrowly missed a number of armed robberies, which was horrible but also great fuel for short stories. One of my co-workers was a published poet, and I still have the signed book he gave me as a leaving present. The writing and gambling industries seem to go well together, somehow. 


Eventually
, I enrolled on a Journalism course at Darlington College. Once all the exams were over I was qualified to work as a junior reporter. For various reasons, this didn’t happen. I’d moved to North Devon with my husband who was in the Royal Marines, and there weren’t many local newspapers or junior reporting jobs around. But I’ve worked as a freelance copywriter and my journalism training was certainly not a waste of time. I discovered the power of an opening sentence, how to firmly grab the reader’s attention, and the importance of editing. The main characters in my novel are journalists, and it is good to have background knowledge about the industry.


Since then I have moved around the country a fair bit, working on my novel, doing the odd piece of copywriting, and working in a succession of NHS administration j
obs. Much like the betting shop period of my life, this is a line of work I fell into accidentally, but somehow it stuck. I like working for the NHS because I feel like I’m doing something worthwhile, and it is inherently unpredictable; things rarely get dull. There are stories everywhere inside hospitals. You hear about, and see, some horrible things and some wonderful things. These polar opposites help to fuel my writing when I find time to switch on my laptop in the evenings. 

 

Running in Circles‘ is available now.

Review: ‘Blood Orange’ by Harriet Tyce

Alison has it all. A doting husband, adorable daughter, and a career on the rise – she’s just been given her first murder case to defend. But all is never as it seems…

Alison drinks too much. She’s neglecting her family. And she’s having an affair with a colleague whose taste for pushing boundaries is becoming more than she can handle.

The woman who Alison’s defending doesn’t deny that she stabbed her husband – she wants to plead guilty but something about her story is deeply amiss. Saving this woman may be the first step to Alison saving herself.

Someone knows Alison’s secrets. Someone who wants to make her pay for what she’s done, and who won’t stop until she’s lost everything….

Ever since I first saw people talking about ‘Blood Orange‘ on Twitter last summer, I was desperate to read it. I was lucky enough to get a very early review copy last year – then to host Harriet Tyce’s first public reading of it at Noir at the Bar in October. Harriet had the audience absolutely transfixed with the excerpt she read aloud and I can promise you that the entire novel is as compelling.

Blood Orange‘ is a thoroughly intriguing domestic thriller. Tyce’s prose is tight and the plot of the novel is an incredibly twisty rollercoaster. ‘Blood Orange‘ is a riveting read centring around revenge, lust and obsession. It’s bound to draw comparisons with ‘The Girl on the Train‘ but, in my opinion, ‘Blood Orange‘ is far superior. 

Harriet Tyce has created a compelling, complex central character perfect for the #MeToo generation. I love how, despite Alison’s flaws, the reader is given an insight into the myriad ways women are subjugated by men. I found myself absolutely livid throughout much of this book because it brought into crystal clear focus how women are abused, dominated or undermined regardless of their personal situation. 

A timely, excellently-plotted novel. Harriet Tyce’s debut is sure to be the smash hit of 2019. 

Vic x

Review: ‘The Last Lie’ by Alex Lake

Claire and Alfie Daniels are the perfect couple. From the outside, they have it all. Claire has a career she loves, great friends and a dream husband. All Claire needs to complete her dream life is a baby. If they can conceive, her life will be perfect. 

For Alfie, though, things couldn’t be more different. His whole existence is built on lies. And he can’t let his wife find out. The problem is, lies have a habit of getting out – and if Claire gets wind of the secrets Alfie’s been keeping, their perfect life will be shattered. 

From the opening page, I was utterly enthralled with ‘The Last Lie‘. Alex Lake’s story unfurls naturally and with a steady pace. The characters she introduces are well-drawn and realistic. I could absolutely believe that the events taking place in this book could happen to anyone. The extraordinary events in these ordinary surroundings reminded me of ‘Doctor Foster‘ and ‘Gone Girl‘. 

Alex Lake has created a compelling narrative that keeps the reader turning the pages until the very end. Lake leads the reader down several avenues and manages to surprise at every turn. ‘The Last Lie‘ is absolute belter of a book, I literally couldn’t put it down. 

I can’t recommend ‘The Last Lie‘ highly enough. 

Vic x

Review: ‘what are you like’ by Shelley Day

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In ‘what are you like‘, Shelley Day studies the human condition and the uncertainties of life. Day evokes familiar yet unusual settings, a library where a mother lives on a shelf and a diner where words fall from the menu.

There is something so ordinary but so other-worldly about each of these stories, lending the narratives an ethereal quality. Day’s descriptions drip with delightful dynamism, conjuring worlds that completely envelope the reader. 

What I liked about the range of stories in this collection is that they provoke the reader and encourage us to ask questions. What is not said is almost more important than what is said in this collection. By trusting the reader, Shelley Day gives her audience the chance to explore their own feelings about a range of issues.

what are you like‘ is full of complex, detailed stories that don’t underestimate the reader and I find that this makes it unlike any other book I have read this year. 

This collection covers such a range of deep issues, dropping characters into almost-impossible situations and seeing how they fare. Shelley Day particularly manages to capture the adolescent voice well. 

An intelligent, thought-provoking read which will stay with the reader long after the stories have ended. 

Vic x

2018 Review: Mhairi Ledgerwood

Today, we welcome one of the newest members of Elementary Sisterhood, Mhairi Ledgerwood. Mhairi has been a big fan of the end of year reviews for a long time and it’s a real pleasure to welcome here to review her 2018.

My thanks to Mhairi for taking the time to reflect on her year.

Vic x

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Do you have a favourite memory professionally from 2018?
Having a play of mine performed at The Royal Court and Northern Stage. Last year I was one of 9 writers selected to be part of The Royal Court Writers Group (north), which was a project with The Royal Court, New Writing North, and Northern Stage. Being part of this group lead to me to writing a play called Paper Tiger. It was performed as a rehearsed reading in London in May and in Newcastle in September. To have a play I’ve written performed in two such prestigious venues was really really special. 

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And how about a favourite moment from 2018 generally?
It’s been an amazing year. As well as the play, I moved house and went to Hong Kong and Vietnam! We have family in Hong Kong so it was an amazing opportunity. We have so many memories from that holiday, but having a tea ceremony at the foot of the big Buddha was a definite highlight. 

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Favourite book in 2018? 
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman. As a playwright I’m used to reading plays so had got out the habit of reading novels. But I picked this up and sped through it. Now I’m back in love with reading novels again. I also loved it because it’s set in Glasgow where I’m from so I could picture the book’s setting really vividly. Apparently Reece Witherspoon’s company has the film rights so I’d love to see it get made! 

Favourite film in 2018? 
Argh so many to choose from! I’m a HUGE film fan and have a Cineworld card as well as following the Oscar race obsessively. There’s been so many good films this year! – The Greatest Showman, Crazy Rich Asians, A Star is Born, BlackkKlansman, WidowsAvengers: Infinity War, Ready Player One, The Post, Isle of Dogs, Ladybird, Mamma Mia: Here We Go AgainA Quiet Place… Do I have to pick just one? Really? How about we go with a film that I’ve not seen yet – Mary Poppins Returns. I’m counting down the days until that’s out. 

Favourite song of the year? 
This is Me from The Greatest Showman I’ve played that song obsessively.

Any downsides for you in 2018?
The process of moving house. You know it’s going to be stressful but we did have some bad luck. Two buyers who pulled out. Three different agents (all terrible) and the mortgage broker we were dealing with left the company with 24 hours notice. Many, many phone calls made trying to chase up the things. The end result of moving into our amazing new house made it worth it – but never again!

Are you making resolutions for 2019?
 To sign up to ballet classes at Dance City in Newcastle. Have wanted to go a regular ballet class for years. Moving closer to Newcastle and the amazing Dance City has made this possible.  

What are you hoping for from 2019?
To push myself further with my writing. Being accepted for the Royal Court Writers Group gave me a huge boost in confidence. It would be great to be shortlisted for a major playwriting opportunity – and hopefully be accepted as well!